Why Touch Temperature Matters

20 February, 2019


Consumers want wearable/ hand-held devices with extended battery life, optimized performance and compact sizing. These requirements make for complex thermal issues and some very hot devices.

Even if you succeed in creating a final product where the inner components are at a comfortable temperature, the external surface temperature can become excessively hot to the touch, negatively impacting user experience. In this way, it is vital to take a device’s surface temperature, or its “Touch Temperature”, into account early in the design process.

In 6SigmaET R13, you can now import two additional industry standard formats, STEP and IGES, which enable the analysis of Touch Temperature through face objects. If you would like to read about STEP and IGES in more detail, click here.

Figure 1. Touch Temperature of the back of a phone

Tool Overview

STEP and IGES import an exact replica of the actual CAD model, with the option to import each surface as an individual “face ”. Faces can be added to both CAD and ET native solid obstructions by right clicking on the solid obstruction and selecting “add all faces”.

With the inclusion of face object, it is now possible to view surface temperatures on individual faces. For outer surfaces, this gives you the Touch Temperature.

How-To

First, you need to have created and solved a model. From here, select the face you are interested in analyzing. You can view the surface temperature, or Touch Temperature, under the results section of the Face Property Sheet:

Figure 2. Surface Temperature or “Touch Temperature” located in the Properties section of selected Face Object

Final Product and User Experience

Products need to be designed with the needs of the end user in mind, and user safety is the utmost requirement that must be met. The Touch Temperature feature makes doing so that much easier. As with any tool, we would love to hear your feedback for future releases— email us at support@futurefacilities.com with your thoughts.


Blog written by: Danielle Gibson, Technical Marketing Writer